Caribbean Blue Books, 1824-1950

Caribbean Blue Books, 1824-1950

Caribbean Blue Books, 1824-1950

The Caribbean Blue Books of National Statistics reveal the origins of the modern day Caribbean; with a scope that encompasses the colonies of Antigua, the Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda, British Honduras, Dominica, Jamaica, Montserrat, St Christopher, Nevis, St Lucia, St. Vincent, Tortola, the Turks Islands, the British Virgin Islands, Trinidad and Tobago. They commence in the 1820s, during the final years of slavery; then cover the development of social services during a century of significant economic upheaval, before concluding in the mid twentieth century as the sun began to set on the British Empire.

Prior to discovery by European explorers, in many cases by Christopher Columbus, the majority of these islands were alleged to have been occupied by two tribes. The group has become known as the Taino or Arawaks, the second as the Caribs. The Caribs are alleged to have killed and chased the peaceful Taino from various islands prior to European occupation. However, the 'Arawak' and 'Carib' labels are disputed, as are legends of peaceful Arawak tribes being overcome by 'cannibalistic' Caribs; these legends being derived from the accounts of colonizers who had every reason to justify their subjugation of the native Amerindians. The term 'Amerindians' has been used in instances where the legends of Arawaks and Caribs have been promulgated; this is so as to avoid the use of these loaded and potentially misleading terms. One clear theme that does emerge from these colonies' histories is that of a swathe of native populations being eradicated, the demise of these populations has been linked to Spanish colonization following their discovery by Christopher Columbus. The native populations that were virtually or entirely eradicated included those of the Bahamas, Barbados, the British Virgin Islands, Jamaica, the Turks Islands and Trinidad. Countries colonized by the British, French and Dutch also saw their native populations eradicated by slavery and disease.

For the most part these statistical records cover the years from 1839 to 1938, although some records commence from 1824 and others continue until 1950. The records for each colony are prefaced by a brief introduction to that colony. In combination these records are more than just statistics, they are stories. The population returns tell the reader who was living in each colony, the Education reports reveal changes in access to the opportunities that education provides. Grants of land reveal who held the colonial wealth, imports and exports reveal how much wealth each colony had to support it and prison statistics reveal who was unable to remain a part of that society. The co-location of these records enables the reader to compare the living conditions and access to services across colonies throughout the march towards independence. By comparing these hidden narratives, with the dates at which independence was achieved, it is possible to observe the extent to which variations in conditions on each colony fueled or slowed its journey toward independence.

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View Metadata | Search Collection | Ref No. : 9781851173235 | Holder Of Originals: British Foreign & Commonwealth Office

Browsing 1-10 of 21 result(s) in Caribbean Blue Books, 1824-1950

Antigua, 1828-1887

Antigua, 1828-1887

Antigua was first colonized by the British in 1632, then run as a sugar colony. Local slaves died by the thousand so African slaves were imported as a more sustainable substitute....

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Bahamas, 1828-1939

Bahamas, 1828-1939

The Bahamas was first settled by Amerindians, then invaded and taken-over by British colonizers in 1686. Piracy was rife when the Bahamas was settled and remained an issue into the 1720s....

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Barbados, 1839-1947

Barbados, 1839-1947

Barbados was first settled by Amerindians, before being taken by Spanish slavers in 1492. The Amerindians were killed by European diseases before the arrival of British colonizers in 1627. The importation...

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Bermuda, 1836-1950

Bermuda, 1836-1950

Bermuda was first occupied by the British in 1609, after a sea captain called George Somers landed there in a desperate bid to save his crew and their sinking ship. The...

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British Guiana, 1868-1938

British Guiana, 1868-1938

The Guianas were first settled by the Surinen people of the Americas, followed by Amerindian tribes. The first European colonizers were the Spanish in 1593, then came the Dutch from 1602,...

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British Honduras, 1839-1938

British Honduras, 1839-1938

First settled by the Maya people, Spain was the first European country to attempt to form a settlement on the land that would become British Honduras; these attempts proved unsuccessful as...

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Dominica, 1826-1887

Dominica, 1826-1887

Dominica was first colonized by the French in 1690 and run as a sugar colony which also used slaves to grow coffee. It was taken by the British in 1761 and...

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Grenada, 1860-1938

Grenada, 1860-1938

First settled by the indigenous Amerindians, it was then colonized by the French in 1650, before being ceded to the British in 1783. From 1795 to 1796 Julien Fedon, a planter...

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Jamaica, 1836-1945

Jamaica, 1836-1945

Upon its discovery in 1494, Jamaica was home to an estimated 60,000 Amerindian people. The settlement of the colony by Spanish colonists resulted in the entire Amerindian population being eradicated by...

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Leeward Islands, 1889-1945

Leeward Islands, 1889-1945

The Leeward Islands include Antigua, Dominica, Montserrat, St Christopher, Nevis and the Virgin Islands amongst others. First settled by the Saladoid people, often from approximately 100 BC, these Islands were then...

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